marmalade.ca

have passport, will travel


Exposure


Posted on Sep 6, 2014 in Geekfu

I’m seriously thinking of ditching WordPress for my travel writing, and using a new photography community called Exposure. The free account gives you three posts, here’s the first: a recap on my Denver trip (which Im sure you’re all tired of hearing about by now, but that town is just so amazing I cant stop writing about it!).

Kelly Knights – Visiting Denver on Exposure

If I go this route, I’ll try and find a happy way to embed the content from Exposure here as well as an alternate way to display my writing. Has anyone out there used this service? I’d love to hear your thoughts on it.

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Mount Falcon, Colorado

Mount Falcon, Colorado


Posted on Sep 6, 2014 in Colorado, USA

One of the things about going to Denver that I was looking forward to the most, were the day trips my friends and I were planning on taking. Colorado makes me think of larger-than-life scenery, wide open skies over pristine mountains and rolling hills. Sure, I knew that somewhere along the way I’d developed an overly-romantic vision of what it would be like, but man was I ever happy to see that I wasn’t too far off!

Facing the foothills of the Colorado Rockies

Facing the foothills of the Colorado Rockies

After a late start on Sunday my friends took me on a trip into the hills on the outskirts of Denver, The Front Ranges. Mount Falcon is about a 40 minute drive west of town, a route that becomes very scenic once you’ve reached the hills. The road gets super windy, and is gorgeous as it cuts through the rocks as you ascend to the park near the top of the hill.

One of the paths that you can follow, The Walker’s Dream trail, leads you to the burnt out husk of a former mansion. Also called the castle and tower ruins, the home was  built by John Brisben Walker in the early 20th century, tragically burning to the ground in 1919. Walker owned a substantial chunk of the land in the Denver area, including the newly restored Union Station neighbourhood and what would eventually become Red Rocks Amphitheatre.

All in all, our wandering around the park took 2-3 hours. We took our time, mostly to account for my slow pace (I kept stopping to take photos,  but also because of the altitude which while not as severe as in Peru, is definitely noticeable and it takes more energy to do simple things like go for a walk than I was accustomed). As with all outings in Colorado, bringing a litre (or more!) of water with you is a must to help combat the altitude and the dry air. Even though it’s at the foothills of the Colorado Rockies, Denver is really more of a prairie city . When you add in the higher altitude, which means you have 25% less protection from the sun (so bring your sunscreen!), you can get dehydrated super fast.

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¡Me voy a regresar a Barcelona!

¡Me voy a regresar a Barcelona!

As long as I can remember, I’ve been in love with Spain. The love affair started in my high school Spanish class, where I easily earned straight A’s — the language rolling naturally off of my tongue. In my early twenties, I was fortunate enough to go on a whirlwind trip with 20 of my coworkers (a year-end bonus!) to Barcelona and Madrid, but with only 3 days in each city it was more of a tease than a taste. Somehow two decades have gone by, and while I’ve thought often of BCN, I somehow hadn’t made it back — until now.

Yesterday I bought a return ticket on KLM, an airline I’ve always wanted to fly, to Barcelona! I’ll be there for 7 nights, which should more than satisfy my catalan cravings. I’m excited to see the progress on the Sagrada Familia, which was hidden beneath scaffolding and completely closed to the public, and to photograph Gaudi’s buildings (which Id been too young to appreciate the last time). I don’t even know all that I don’t know about Barcelona, so the next few months will be filled with my eager planning of this visit. I’m also planning to take one or two day trips out of the city, to Monserrat and one other place perhaps? So many decisions, I’m stupidly excited!

You too, Amsterdam!

As KLM’s hub is in Amsterdam, I’ve worked in a two-night visit to that city as well. AMS is one of those great world cities that I’ve always wanted to visit, but not as my main destination. I knew that by flying KLM I’d be able to do a layover and I think two days is enough time for me to visit (and photograph!) the city’s iconic landmarks and to take a bicycle tour around town.

Hurray for dreams coming true!

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Breathtaking!

Breathtaking!

You wind among rocks of every conceivable and inconceivable shape and size… all bright red, all motionless and silent, with a strange look of having been just stopped and held back in the very climax of some supernatural catastrophe. – Helen Hunt Jackson

My first full day in Colorado, we packed ourselves into the car and headed south on the I-25 from Denver to Colorado Springs. Our destination: The Garden of the Gods. I’d seen red rock formations peppered around Denver in the few hours I’d been in town, and was anxious to get up close and see them in person so was thrilled to discover that where we were headed was a US Natural National Landmark precisely because of these rocks.

You should go to there.

You should go to there.

The park is absolutely free and open to hikers, technical rock climbers, horseback riding, mountain biking — you name it, and it seems to be done here. We saw young kids clamouring over specially designated rocks, climbing fearlessly feet above the ground without a harness (I was convinced one little girl was part mountain goat, and would have kept climbing had her dad not called her back to the ground), families with dogs of all shapes and sizes (including a lovely Corgi named Tank!), women in flip-flops and maxi-dresses out for a stroll, two guys climbing one of the higher peaks then sitting at the summit watching us all go by like ants, and park rangers who were there to answer any question you had about the rocks and their history. It’s an amazing public space, and fantastic to photograph!

I could have sat and looked at these rocks all day

I could have sat and looked at these rocks all day

The one thing that is forbidden, and you would think this to be a no-brainer, is to NOT carve on the soft sandstone rocks. There are signs everywhere, yet we hadn’t even been in the park five minutes when we came across a woman leaning over a wooden fence to carve a her initials onto a boulder formation. “Are you sure you’re supposed to be doing that?” I asked, ever the polite Canadian. “There are signs everywhere telling you not to do this!”, my friend snapped at her; we were all appalled and pretty pissed off. As for the woman, she seemed stunned that anyone would have spoken to her, preventing her from doing whatever she wanted. As my other friend said, what a great lesson she was teaching her children. While I would have liked to have hoped that other folks would have said something to her had we not come along, there were other adults milling around her to wait their turn to deface a rock that had been there for millions of years, or passing her by without saying a word.

Despite the gorgeous day, the park was surprisingly uncrowded

Despite the gorgeous day, the park was surprisingly uncrowded

I’m not certain if we lucked out, or if this was the norm, but we were able to enjoy the park without feeling as though we were being suffocated by thousands of people. The park receives over 2 million visitors annually, but it sure didn’t seem to be busy when we were there. Sure, there were small pockets of people around the more accessible formations such as the one we climbed a top of and sat until the altitude started to make me dizzy (or my altitude-paranoia did anyway; after Peru I’ve been understandably twitchy about going anywhere higher than sea-level!), or near cluster points at corners or near the washrooms. Other than that though, I feel blessed to have been able to take so many fantastic photographs of the landscape.

Doesn't this make you want to go down that path?

Doesn’t this make you want to go down that path?

Notes on shooting with my Fuji X-E2

This day trip was my first bonafide travel photography session with my new Fuji X-E2. I’m glad I’d taken the time while at home in Toronto to get accustomed to using the wee beastie, because while in Colorado I was able to set things up without a lot of trial and error and simply enjoy being out in the gorgeous scenery. After all of the years travelling with my Canon DSLR, this was the first time I’d not felt bogged down by my camera gear (which makes sense, as the X-E2 is a fraction of the size and heft of my old XTi). For the most part, I simply tossed the camera in my daypack or my purse and off we went!

My gorgeous new 18mm lens, lens cap, and hood cap

My gorgeous new 18mm lens, lens cap, and hood cap

While I had brought both the 18mm prime lens and the 18-55mm kit lens with me to Denver, I shot exclusively with the 18mm over the course of the trip. I love that lens so much, it hasn’t been off the camera since the day it arrived! I still enjoy the zoom that the 18-55 gives me, but I feel that I’d rather have a longer lens to complement the 18mm and to leave the 18-55 at home. I’ve my eye on either the 50-230mm or the 55-200 OIS lens next, but need to do a bit of research to see if it’s worth spending the few extra hundred dollars that OIS lens calls for.

Any Fujinistas out there? Which lens would you recommend I get next, and why?

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